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My D620 Nvidia based laptop has gone belly up...


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.....I assume due to nvidia graphics issue, my wife was using it and it froze with screen corruption - she handed it to me and no response - so rebooted and now I only get the power light, Bluetooth light and num-lock light - completely blank screen/no bleeps/no post!

 

Assume it needs re-flow - but I don't have facilities to do this and can't say it's worth paying someone to do it (as it can't be guaranteed to last anyway and budget is low). I have read about doing this in an oven - but I don't fancy this - perhaps as a last resort.

 

Any suggestions? I'm in the UK and it has a perfect 1440x900 screen. Budget is low and we have other laptops - so not critical to get it working immediately.

 

I've looked at perhaps getting a second hand mobo - perhaps with Intel graphics - do the D620's with Intel on board graphics drive the 1440x900 screen OK? Intel as I don't want to risk another failure - mobo's seem to go for about £30 inclusive of P+P.

 

Thanks in advance

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Well, if the GPU's points are off right now, not much to lose...

 

D620 GMA (or D630 GMA) support LoRes and HiRes LCD. It's only controlled by the LCD itself (LCD + inverter + ribbon cable -> all 3 required), so you can swap. If you swap on a Hackintoshed D620/D630, remember to change DSDT table too.

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I've had excellent results re-flowing broken Xbox 360's in the oven. Problem gets when you can't fine tune your oven (by 1-3 degrees) to get the proper melting point without baking the PCB. (Printed Circuit Board) I do not recommend this method at all in any American consumer oven. (For example, a GE or a Magic Chef oven purchased for home use.)

 

An easier method is getting a commercial heat gun and build a "rig" to hold the heat gun as near/far to the PCB as you would like. Try it on junk electronics. Burn the solder out, then re-flow it so you can fine tune your heat gun/procedure and get in some good practice before you attempt this on something that might be able to be fixed. ;)

 

Non-commercial heat guns will work, however you cannot adjust the temperature when necessary. You have to move the gun closer/further to the object you are re-flowing. If you cannot get a gun that adjusts temperature, try to get a max temperature reading on the gun. (Google, read the manual for the gun, etc...) This will give you a general idea on how hot the gun gets on direct heat. If you have a laser thermometer, you can really make a non-commercial heat gun shine, because it will tell you how hot you are flowing and you can adjust accordingly.

 

Know your re-flow solder melting point! Certain re-flow kits are selling low heat solder. While this isn't bad, they dont expressly tell you that its low-heat. I've done this, sadly. Re-flow an Xbox360 and ruin it, because of low-heat solder. You end up with a PCB thats basically useless, because its coated in solder.

 

Being able to set your temperature and having a steady hand (an adjustable rig is better!) makes for a very easy re-flow, that if done properly, will last as long (or longer!) than original. 

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preheat oven to 200*c/ 375*f range. strip mobo of all plastic stickers use some no clean liquid flux for reflow work they sell it on ebay. on affected area like gpu. turn an aluminum disposable pan upside down and place mobo in oven leave for 10 minutes in already preheated oven then shut off and crack door to allow cooling after the ten minutes of baking are up. brought back a d620 nvidia so far works for over a year

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Recently Ibought a D630 on Ebay with the Nvidea issue (just mainly for the processor  I wanted to upgrade my 1.8 to a 2.1 plus the case was more of a decent shape than mine,to my surprise,it came with a bluetooth,and a dw1940 wifi card ,screen was also in decent shape,. 

   So I figured why not lets Betty Crocker this thing,..

First thing I did

(1)is completely  remove the motherboard then peeled back all the protective stickers (the black plastic ones since the will just bubble and warp,. including the one on the PCI card if you can,mine melted a little no big deal (the yellow ribbon left on was fine)you can restick them back afterwards)

(2) preheat your oven to 385 degrees (it will heat at a higher temp to reach this,.At 400 things will start to burn)

(3) some people use aluminium foil and little wads of aluminum to level the board ,I didn't bother since its pretty flat anyway

       I just placed mine same side up on a grey nonstick baking sheet on the rack which sits about center in the oven

(4) let sit for exactly 9 min. (cleaned the dried gunk off the cpu and heatsink while waiting)

(5) Removed it at 9min and let it as still as possible until cool mine cooled in 14 min

(6) replace stickets and fresh thermal paste,. install

  

(7) A BoTa BooM, A BoTa Bing ,.I Cant believe this crap works ,.Im Actually writing from this right now ,.will use this as my daily and repost back in  6months to let you how its held up,much thanks for the post !!!   

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I've done it on my D630.  Pretty amazing that it really does work.

 

I used the aluminum foil ball standoff method to keep the bottom side components from touching the pan and possibly getting hotter than everything else.

I also used a (portable) convection toaster oven preheated to 400 degrees and then baked for exactly 10 minutes.  The convection oven provides more even heating and let me do the whole thing in the garage so I didn't stink up the house with potentially harmful out gassing.

 

FYI, the solder bonds that fail are not the ones between the Nvidia GPU package and the circuit board.  They are actually the ones between the silicon chip's pads and their matching (flip chip) pads inside the package itself.  

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